Archive for the ‘ads’ Category

KLM Sit on Air

Quite a clever stunt-ad! I wonder how often do the actor get to take a break too (without spoiling the wonder as he disengages from his position)…

Sneaky Ad on F1 Cars

Came across a very interesting article on graphicology showing how Malboro attempts to circumvent the no-tobacco-ad ruling in sports like F1. Here’s the picture showing the before/after:

Could you consider this as an ingenious subversive – and perhaps subliminal – advertising? While static it’s innocent enough as a barcode-like design motif, but at high speeds it blurs off to a somewhat familiar set of colors/proportions:

In a somewhat tangential note – it reminds me also of this article on the recent re-release of  Naomi Klein’s ‘No Logo’. Originally released in 1999 it was a passionate report documenting how mega-corporates manipulates consumers through subversive marketing despite the products questionable origins (of manufacture, eco-credibility, etc.). However, its popularity ironically also spurred marketers to engage in marketing tactics to appear ever more authentic and grassroots – using subversive techniques that bypasses the formal channels. This Malboro ad could just be one of  the many manifestations.

Canal+ Ad

I think anything I say would probably give away the punch line – so: quite the fantastic ad from Canal+.

Loanshark Marketing

Recently I’ve taken a special interest in a rather niche segment of marketing – those done by loan sharks. Johor Bahru (or JB – city in Malaysia) has a very high density of these (theoretically?) illegal money-lending businesses, catering to anybody from gamblers seeking a quick rescue to ‘proper’ businessmen needing just that bit more cash flow.

Growing up, I had the common impression of loansharks where they are generally  underground – where you need some sort of mafia-connection to get access to it. In JB this is a lot more ‘above-the-line’, where you’d see signs and phone numbers pasted all over, on practically every surface you can find.

Recently though, I get impressed yet again with their level of  ‘marketing professionalism’ – just received this set of brochures (only showing the front/back):

front

back

Check out the amount of design and creative direction (everything from layout, typography, photography to copy-writing, consistency in theme between the 3 separate brochures) that went into promoting their services: simply impressive!

Fight for Kisses

I think… with the developments of Youtube, viral marketing and such, marketers have upped their antes in an attempt to out-weird one another – the ad above for a shaver is probably just yet another example of the absurdity (and yet hilarity and memorability) in the years to come…

Sony PS3 “The Play Face”

sony playface

When we’re immersed in an intense activity – gaming and watching a sports match perhaps – our mind enters z certain ‘zone’. Being fully concentrated on the game, we lose our self-awareness and personal restraint, unleashing the truest facial expressions.

That is exactly what PS3 wants to capture in their campaign “Play Face“:

It’s that face you make when you are playing video games and concentrating so much that you don’t even realize the kind of expressions you are making. And everyone has a different one.

Here’s a video:

There are also (very) similar prior projects though – such as “Immersion” by Robbie Cooper and “Video Gamers” by Philip Toledano. Concept originality aside, I thought highlighting the ‘play face’ was an engaging move by PS3 – we all know it, we are instinctively and visually connected with that ‘face moments’ if we’ve ever played any games ourselves, and it communicates the riveting nature of videogames perfectly.

Schwepperverscence Ad

Sony Bravia may be one of the early pioneers of ads in this style – but this latest ads from Schweppes is no less in artistic merit either. Using high-speed cameras at 10,000 frames per second, the ad lines up a series of moments just as water balloons burst, releasing the splashes of water inside in a cool, sensual and captivating manner (when seen in slow-motion and paired with apt music).

Hopefully more ads in the future move towards this!

D&AD HP Ad

The brief for the students participating in D&AD awards was:

“Present an idea which promotes HP Workstations ability to bring to life anything the creative mind can conceive.”

And what a response by Matt Robinson and Tom Wrigglesworth – using the HP printers to print out a series of images, dancing patterns as one big stop motion – precisely and yet imaginatively answering the brief. If this doesn’t win for the execution, it must also win by the virality that this entry has generated (judging by how much free publicity it has garnered by making the rounds around the net).

Clever Nikon Ad

nikon

This is  a brilliant billboard advertisement execution for Nikon’s new D700 camera in Seoul.

Along a busy subway station, there’s a backlit billboard featuring images of paparazzi (presumably holding the D700). As passers-by walk past, flashes are triggered, giving the illusion that the paparazzi in the billboard are jostling to snap a picture of the passers-by. The red carpet on the floor completes the scene, while also leading them to the store where the camera can be bought.

This ad is genius on a few levels:

  1. Attracts specific attention of the passer-by – there’s simply no way you can not look at the source of flashes.
  2. Appropriate – the context of the paparazzi photographers with Nikon cameras is a perfect pairing as well. Not only is the context for grabbing your attention with the flashes appropriate, the fact that paparazzi are probably one of the most discerning users of the camera (implicit endorsement) is also at work.
  3. The red carpet also serving dual-function: setting up the scene to make the passer-by feel like a celebrity, while also simultaneously doing the very important role of attention-conversion (into possible purchase) by leading to the shop.

Genius!

[via The Cool Hunter]

Nothing to Hide (Air New Zealand)

At first it looks just like any normal in-flight safety briefing video, perhaps just a little cheerier and more upbeat than usual. If you look closer, however, you’d realize that all the crews doing the briefing are… naked!

Fear not of indecent bits though – while they’re naked, they’re body painted with their usual uniform to still look very much un-naked; and of course, all their camera takes are cleverly angled and timed to avoid any sensitive exposure.

And why go through all these? The airline behind it – Air New Zealand – is promoting their tagline of having “Nothing to hide” (no hidden charges for checked baggage, refreshments, etc.). I suppose this somewhat gimmicky video just about captures this spirit and eyeballs!

(PS: the guy loading the baggage in the video is actually the CEO Rob Fyfe – I don’t suppose many CEOs have this sense of fun and involvement with their company!)