Archive for the ‘singapore’ Category

Open Forum/Talk: Designing Designers

[Edit/Note: This event is postponed to Apr 23 instead.]

Calling Singapore-based design students and young designers: you might want to mark your calendar for Philips Senior Design Manager Brian Ling – perhaps more familiar to most of you as the man behind Design Sojourn – will be hosting a talk/forum/discussion on April 9th at Feng Zhu School of Design. Get some tips, ask some questions, get to know people … there’s always something to learn and improve on!

RSVP by April 3rd to rsvp@fzdschool.com or +65 63349258.

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studio juju @Milan Fair

Singapore-based designer-duo Timo Wong and Priscilla Lui formed “studio juju” based on the philosophy of a hands-on approach to designing and crafting. For the Milan Fair this year, they’d be launching some of their collections:

Rabbit
None of the tables are the same in height, dimension or shape. The arrangement becomes fluid and, hopefully, will inspire an indefinite interaction when people sit themselves along the curves and place their cups on different heights and shapes.
rabbit
rabbit-2

One Shelves
A set of small boxes that can be nested together to take up the least amount of space and expanded without tools to form a big shelf. stack and arrange the boxes to fit different rooms.
one-shelves1

one-shelves-2

Things we Forget

Just discovered ‘TO DO:‘, a site chronicling Post-it notes left all over public places in Singapore, often reminding us of the simple wisdoms of life. An example – pasted (very appropriately?) onto a heart-diagram poster in a hospital:

follow-your-heart

follow-your-heart-poster

I love that they are nicely (hand-) drawn – and perhaps someday I’d stumble upon one of these too!

Many more here.

Carl Liu Talk – Friday 7th Nov

Session with Carl Liu

One of the more prominent Asian industrial designers (and now Walt Disney China’s Creative Manager) Carl Liu is going to be sharing his thoughts through a talk titled “Design is not rocket science” in Singapore Polytechnic. So if you’re in Singapore and have some spare time this Friday, drop by and see what he has to say! I’d be there too.

Details:
Carl Liu’s Talk – “Design is not Rocket Science”
7th Nov (Fri), 7pm
LT 1A (above MacDonald’s)
Singapore Polytechnic, Singapore

[Register (before 6th November]

Singapore Formula 1 Photos

The Formula 1 Grand Prix in Singapore last Sunday was the first of the republic – it was also the first time it takes place at night. I’ve always been partial to street circuits as I feel they give a raw and yet romantic sense of speed – perhaps something that is easier to relate to for the average fan.

Anyway, it was a magnificient night with the flood lights gracing the track with the Singapore downtown skyline as a backdrop. Most Singaporeans probably haven’t watched a single F1 race in their lives (“too boring!”) – but last weekend droves turned up to check it out and I’m sure many have found new appreciation in the sport. I was down near the track too as the cars zipped around on practice days – and certainly for me it felt quite a bit different from what I’ve seen: the noise, the smell and the sense of proximity (that the cars aren’t just doing overhyped roundabouts in some circuits far away) gave me a different perception of the sports.

As seen from the examples above, Boston.com seems to be getting into a habit of amassing great events-reportage pictures (see their Olympics coverage too).

[Full set of Singapore F1 Grand Prix pictures from Boston.com]

NUS Industrial Design Graduation Show 2008

The 6th batch of Industrial Design graduates from the National University of Singapore will be hosting their graduation show at The Central (Singapore), from 30th May to 1st June. If you’re in town, do drop by and check it out. If not, you can always drop by their website, which also hosts some of their works:

[Greenhouse Effect] Concepts (Part 4)

This is the fourth (and last) part of the the GreenHouse Effect concept series, showing and explaining some of the thoughts behind the design concepts. The GreenHouse Effect is an exhibition by Orcadesign as part of the Singapore Design Festival, exploring what it means to tackle sustainability through design.

Lullaby Plug

Lullaby Plug Explanation

We have many mobile and electronic accessories, and when we charge them we tend to leave it on and forget about them (or go to sleep). Even while they are fully charged, the devices still consume phantom electricity. There’s also always the nagging suspicion that such overcharging may reduce battery life.

Borrowing a familiar metaphor found in baby pull-string toys, the Lullaby Plug is a power socket with an intuitive timer interface. Pulling the string down activates the power supply; the length you pulled is proportionate to the time you require (markings are on the string for every hour).  As the device gets charged, the ring slowly retreats upwards until it finally cuts off power after the desired timespan.

PaperHaus

PaperHaus Usage

Newspaper recycling is one of the more accessible and common eco practice (at least here) – they are often however either stacked at a corner messily, or are relegated to the storeroom. Their fate somewhat mirrors the mindset of households – they are conceived more as an inconvenient waste rather than a valuable resource input (albeit recycled).

The PaperHaus elegantly houses the newspapers, fitting into the living room environment (where newspapers are often read/kept). Flaps on the four sides keep strings neatly tucked. The graphics on the rear wall does more than lifting the product visually – it also indicates how many kilograms of newspapers are accumulated. When you’re done, you can just unzip the edges, tie and bring the newspaper for sale/recycling.

[This post is a part of the series on the ‘GreenHouse Effect’ exhibition under the Singapore Design Festival]. This will be the final post on it – if you have any comments or critiques of any of the ideas (or the thought behind), let ’em loose!]

[Greenhouse Effect] Concepts (Part 3)

This is the third part of the the GreenHouse Effect concept series, showing and explaining some of the thoughts behind the design concepts. The GreenHouse Effect is an exhibition by Orcadesign as part of the Singapore Design Festival, exploring what it means to tackle sustainability through design.

Bottleneck Saver

This is the Bottleneck Saver – it’s the little black ‘C’ shape thing on the neck of the nozzle. It’s a little simple device designed to attach onto the necks of common dispensers – be it shampoo, lotions or handwash – and it works by restricting the ‘travel’ of the nozzle (and thus the final amount dispensed each time). It may not be a product for everyone – some do need that much of whatever solution is in the bottle – but what Bottleneck Saver gives is a choice. Just think of the average crew-cut guy – typically he doesn’t need all that shampoo for one full press; by natural instinct, however, he would have dispensed a full amount. In addition, manufacturers always have an incentive to make users use more of their products – in some ways, this design attempts to counter that inherent bias in product design. It’s not only less of the soap/shampoo that you save – eventually you’d save more water too.

Sticker Identity

The product in this picture is actually in the top right corner – it is a set of stickers known as Sticker Identity. Often, we sub-consciously or conveniently reuse old products for new usages – we might make do with the back-of-a-notepad as a mousepad; we might use a CD jewel case as a coaster, etc. This is in fact a good practice – we don’t really need to always get a new item. The sticker set affirms these actions – iconic graphics on the sticker affirms the new-found identity of old products – in someways, you can think of it as a ‘re-birth certificate’.

[This post is a part of the series on the ‘GreenHouse Effect’ exhibition under the Singapore Design Festival].

[Greenhouse Effect] Concepts (Part 2)

This is the second part of the the GreenHouse Effect concept series, showing and explaining some of the thoughts behind the design concepts. The GreenHouse Effect is an exhibition by Orcadesign as part of the Singapore Design Festival, exploring what it means to tackle sustainability through design.

Black Out Lamp

This is the Black Out Lamp. In normal days, it sits pretty as per any normal table lamp, casting light through the efficient LED light bulbs. But it’s more than just a table lamp – if and when you need a torch, you can actually detach the ‘lamp’ portion and use it as a torch, as the internal circuit can be switched to run on battery mode instead. For the same function (of illumination), we don’t really need two separate products (lamp + torch). They could very well be the same thing – plus you can definitely find it much easier compared to ransacking your third drawer in the store room.

Facade Vase

The question – what exactly is a vase? Do we need a real, whole (and pretty) object to place flowers in, or is a simple facade up to the mark? Made of industrial felt, the construction of the Facade Vase is absolutely simple – two flat pieces of felt sewn together. It then becomes a parasite onto a ‘partner’ as structure – the omnipresent PET bottle that we almost certainly can find around our house – and becomes a fully functional vase. It is a versatile design too – different silhouette gives rise to rather different visual outcome.

Post-It Notepad

Post-It pads are almost exclusively used on one side only. We also often scribble only on one side of our notepads. So, we have two ‘one-sided’ products. In this concept Post-It Notepad, the second life usability is built into the design. You start off with the notepad (using one side, presumably). When you’re done, you can remove the cover, turn it over and you get a Post-It pad. A product’s reincarnation is straightforward and integrated within the design – turning two ‘one-sided’ products into a single ‘double-sided’ one.

[This post is a part of the series on the ‘GreenHouse Effect’ exhibition under the Singapore Design Festival].

[Greenhouse Effect] Concepts (Part 1)

Cup Lasso

Cup Lasso might require some understanding of the Singaporean context. When you buy a take-away hot drink in a coffee shop, chances are you’d end up with a disposable plastic cup carrier (the green thing on the left photo). Cup Lasso (pictured on the right) is a permanent alternative to this item. Apart from reducing the usage of plastic carriers (which may occur on a daily basis – e.g. for your post-lunch coffee), it can also be an identity, a statement in support of being more sustainable – somewhat like the Live Strong bracelets.

‘Bin There’ Table

‘Bin There’ is a table with an in-built rubbish trapdoor. While eliminating an unnecessary extra rubbish bin, it also makes it more convenient for the users, who can simply sweep their tabletop wastes into a plastic bag below. Eco-design does not necessitate sacrifices – in some cases, they can even enhance the functions. The plastic bag can be hanged onto sliding hooks below the table, accommodating a wide variety of plastic bag sizes.

Wax Pod

WaxPod brings a familiar eco-concept to a new area of application. Refillable shampoos, lotions, etc. have been around for a long time – they consume less resources as the refills are packed in less energy and resource intensive packagings. Why not hair wax then – as it is a product that one uses constantly? In WaxPod, the white external casing is permanent, while refills come in ‘pods’ (black parts). The slits you see at the bottom of the product are vents for an optional air-freshener module, which are frequently deployed within the same setting. This reduces the total packaging and housing materials required substantially.

[This post is part of the series on the ‘GreenHouse Effect’ exhibition under the Singapore Design Festival].